Hormone replacement therapy for surgically induced menopause

My oncologist prescribed HRT to prevent/alleviate the effects of surgically-induced menopause. She said the overall impact on my quality of life would outweigh the negligible risk to my cancer (high grade serous, 3C). I’m trying to evaluate the risks v. benefits of using a low dose, estradiol patch. If you have been in a similar position and could share your insight/knowledge I’d really appreciate it. 

Comments

  • @nadiaC this is a great discussion topic, thanks for posting it! I too was prescribed HRT for surgically induced menopause. However, I was a little hesitant to take conventional HRT so I held off. I decided to go the bio-identical hormone route through a Naturopath. I did take the bio-identicals (cream) for a while, but I didn't really notice much difference and then stopped. I currently don't take anything - maybe my body has just gotten used to menopause now, but I found that my hot flashes and mood swings aren't that bad anymore. However, I'm still worried about what the absence of hormones will do to my body in the long term. Very interested to hear what others have done when it comes to HRT and surgical menopause.
  • LoDMLoDM
    edited July 20

    @jiselle16 , is your cancer hormone dependent?

    Mine yes, (low grade serous 1C) and I don't have access to any estrogen replacement (too risky), except for an estrogen capsule that I use vaginally to avoid extreme dryness. (I'm 34 years old). For the moment, apart from a few hot flashes and joint pain in the morning, I have no other side effects that are difficult to bear. However, I am much more active than before and eat much better, which I believe can help to lessen and prevent the harmful effects of menopause. (Even if I was already in good shape before the diagnosis!) 

    For the long term effects of estrogen deficiency, I take calcium and vitamin D supplements and try to include cardio and weight training a little. little but every day, to prevent heart problems and osteoporosis.

    Ah, and I forgot, I'm also taking progesterone ... which might prevent a recurrence even though studies don't prove anything yet.

    Have a nice day!
    Laurence
  • Hello @nadiaC and @jiselle16, is your cancer hormone dependent?

     Mine yes, (low grade serous) and I have no access to any replacement estrogen (too risky) except for an estrogen capsule which I use vaginally to avoid extreme dryness. (I'm 34 years old). So far, aside from a few hot flashes and joint pain in the morning, I don't have any other side effects that are difficult to bear. However, I am much more active than before and eat a lot better, which I believe can help reduce and prevent the negative effects of menopause. (Even though I was already fine before the diagnosis!)

    For the long term effects of estrogen deficiency, I take calcium and vitamin D supplements and try to include cardio and weight training a little. little but every day, to prevent heart problems and osteoporosis. Ah, and I forgot, I'm also taking progesterone ... which might prevent a recurrence even though studies don't prove anything yet.

    Have a nice day!
    Laurence
  • Hi @LoDM Thanks for sharing your story and the ways in which you are managing menopause. I didn’t know about the vaginal estrogen capsule. Also, hadn’t heard that progesterone may prevent recurrence. Lots to discuss with my doctor! 
  • Hello @nadiaC, can I ask you where are you being followed?
  • nadiaCnadiaC
    edited July 21
    @LoDM I’m at the Cedars Cancer Center at the McGill University Health Center in Montreal 
  • @LoDM I had clear cell, and I don't recall the oncologist ever saying that type of cancer was hormone dependent. Although I'm not sure if all types of ovarian cancer are hormone dependent, or just some?
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